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Barbara Isaacs – need for parents to understand play

Barbara Isaacs (Montessori Global Ambassador) talks about the need for parents to understand play.

Good for looking at

  • Learning through play
  • Montessori approach
  • Playing with water
  • Language and communication
  • Maths
  • Science
  • Supporting parents
  • Effective practice
 
00:00
There is still enormous amount work to be done,
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particularly from one to three practitioners
00:05
in relation to parents understanding what play is,
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and what play means to the children,
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because we have specific materials for teaching phonics.
00:17
We have activities for extending the children's
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understanding of number and shape.
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Parents are often attracted by these more academic
00:26
areas of learning.
00:29
This out of the understanding that playing with water
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whilst they are doing some of the activities
00:35
of everyday living is in fact a phenomenal
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preparation for mathematics,
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it enables the child to estimate
00:42
and enables them to observe the flow of the water,
00:45
it enables them to refine their skills.
00:49
Tidying or mopping up the water when it has spilled,
00:53
just following the flow of water
00:55
and how it changes according to how you tip
00:58
your handle, the jug with the water,
00:60
it's a scientific experiment.
01:04
I'd send it down and then shoot it up.
01:08
Whoa, two of these are a bit lower.
01:14
It's flying everywhere.
01:18
Okay, that sends it the other way.
01:23
Shall we test it on these balls then?
01:24
We can wash it at the same time.
01:26
Mmh.
01:29
So you would think...
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What do we think it would do?
01:33
Don't work that way around, do they?
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Or they do work with bottles,
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but that's what it actually does,
01:40
on the side it actually curves.
01:42
Oh yeah.
01:45
That's probably the bowl shape,
01:48
and the other way around, it works real well.
01:55
Doesn't make so much of a force field, that one,
01:57
does it?
01:58
Well, it does make a men force field actually.
02:00
The teaspoon is really good.
02:03
[Narrator] - So enabling parents, when you understand,
02:06
that learning begins from the moment
02:09
when the child engages the environment to some extent
02:13
and that if it is available in a playful manner,
02:17
it will be so meaningful to the child and
02:19
that all those activities the child does in the nursery
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if they're well considered,
02:27
and well explained,
02:28
will enhance the child's learning for numeracy
02:32
and literacy or the formal learning,
02:34
in fact, the play is such a rich preparation,
02:39
in readiness for school because it is so all encompassing
02:44
of all the aspects of learning.
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It doesn't isolate phonics as the way of learning,
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it prepares the the child for phonics by listening,
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by using sounds, by playing his language,
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by listening carefully to your friends
02:59
or sounds in the environment, all of that is very valuable.