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Attachment in practice – Attachment behaviour, separation anxiety

00:10
At nine months,
00:11
Layla is now wary of strangers.
00:18
She shows anxiety known as separation anxiety
00:21
and cries when Jess leaves her with a stranger.
00:31
An infant's fear of separation in an unfamiliar situation
00:34
is of such importance that she'll do almost anything
00:37
not to be abandoned.
00:47
When she's back with Jess,
00:48
Layla feels safe and can explore the stranger visually.
00:53
Jess is the secure base from which
00:55
Layla will more and more learn about the world.
00:60
Now Layla is 10 months old
01:02
and able to shuffle around on her bottom.
01:05
Up till now, Layla has had to rely on her signals
01:08
to bring her attachment figure close.
01:10
Now, she can be responsible
01:12
for much of the keeping close herself.
01:19
The initial kind of reason why
01:22
separation anxiety and fear of strangers evolve is,
01:25
to protect us from predators.
01:27
So we've scuttled back to our safe base,
01:31
which is our parent, if you like.
01:35
Same time, What also happens is brain maturation,
01:39
if you like, because it's around that
01:42
this time that babies develop what's called
01:45
object permanence.
01:48
French psychologist called Jean Piaget
01:51
who discovered this many, many years ago,
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and essentially what object permanence means is that
01:58
the baby comes to realize that even if an object
02:02
or a thing or a person disappears out of sight,
02:06
they still continue to exist.
02:09
So it's the time when you drop something
02:11
from the high chair and you actually look down because
02:13
you realize that, that it's still there.
02:16
Or if you hide something behind a screen,
02:19
the baby will look for it.
02:25
Where's the rapid gun? Ooh there it is.
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By this time the baby has built up a memory
02:34
of the parent in his or her head.
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And realizes that when the parent leaves,
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there was such a thing called a parent
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that made me feel really safe and secure,
02:47
and I want her back here quickly, please.
02:50
So that's, it all comes together
02:53
in a very kind of evolutionary, yeah,
02:57
wonderful design in many respects.
03:04
At 15 months, again with the unfamiliar adult,
03:08
Layla feels free to explore `so long as Jesse's there,
03:12
but shows strong separation anxiety
03:15
as soon as she leaves the room.
04:00
Layla at 16 months
04:02
is now securely attached to Jess.
04:06
She isn't happy to be left with strangers
04:09
and shows anxiety when separated.
04:13
Jess is now her secure base.
04:15
She knows there will always be help if she needs it.
04:19
Jess has helped regulate her emotions
04:22
by responding quickly and sensitively to her.
04:27
Secure attachment
04:29
is important in helping children learn to talk
04:31
and Jess and Layla
04:33
are developing a good understanding of each other.
04:38
This one, listen, very exciting,
04:40
do you wanna go and get another book,
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go and get another book,
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This primary attachment,
04:46
the first close relationship will make a sort of blueprint
04:50
or internal model in the brain
04:52
for Layla's relationships in the future.
04:57
The development of secure attachment is the most common,
05:01
but not all babies become securely attached.