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Introduction to partnership with parents

This course session covers:

  • The theory of secondary attachments
  • The effects that missing someone can have on the child
  • The every day practicalities of being a key person and how you can be supported

Length of session:

The session should take between 30 to 40 minutes

You will need:

Each participant will need a pen and a note book or a printed copy of the Session 2.4 Partnership with parents task sheet - Available in the further reading section
00:10
To begin with,
00:11
babies need to know that their primary care givers,
00:13
who are usually their parents, are close by,
00:15
in order for them to feel safe.
00:18
If a child has plenty of positive experiences
00:21
of attachment early on,
00:22
they gradually learn to carry with them
00:24
a feeling of being nurtured and cared about,
00:27
even when they're separate from their parent
00:29
or primary attachment.
00:30
They have a sense of being held in mind.
00:33
That this special person thinks about them,
00:35
and cares about them wherever they may be.
00:40
This gives the child a powerful sense of security,
00:43
which allows them to leave their safe base,
00:45
and go out confidently into the world.
00:49
It's natural for young children
00:51
to experience feelings of distress
00:53
when leaving their special person,
00:54
and all children need support with this at times.
00:57
Bye bye.
01:01
See you later.
01:01
Good day.
01:04
If a child's sense of being held in mind
01:06
and securely attached is very weak, or maybe non existent,
01:10
the role of their secondary attachment figure
01:12
is crucial to supporting their primary attachments
01:16
and work as a backup.
01:18
It's another complex part of the key person role,
01:21
but one that can make such a huge difference
01:23
to a child's well being and development.
01:31
The originator of the key person approach
01:35
is, of course, Elena Goldschmidt,
01:37
an international trainer and consultant in early years,
01:41
and one of the things she was so strong about
01:44
in talking in developing the key person approach
01:48
was the importance of a triangle of relationships
01:51
between the child, the parents, and the key person.
01:55
And she always maintained
01:57
that no key person approach should be attempted
01:60
unless that triangle of relationships
02:03
was carefully nurtured and maintained.
02:07
Her thinking behind, that was that there's a danger
02:11
of a very close relationship developing
02:13
between the key person and their key children.
02:17
And that slowly and subtly,
02:19
parents are cut out of that picture.
02:22
And of course, parents always remain
02:24
the most important people in their child's life.
02:27
And they must almost always be part
02:30
of the child's relationships with key staff at nursery.
02:35
So I think it's very helpful to keep in mind
02:37
that triangle of relationships between parents,
02:40
child and key person, and the relationship
02:43
between the key person and the parents
02:46
is as important to maintain and nurture
02:49
as the relationship between the key person
02:51
and the child so that parents are always part
02:53
of the picture, always involved, always kept in mind.