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Introduction to Shared Care

This course session covers:

  • The theory of secondary attachments
  • The effects that missing someone can have on the child
  • The every day practicalities of being a key person and how you can be supported

Length of session:

The session should take between 30 to 40 minutes

You will need:

Each participant will need a pen and a note book or a printed copy of the Session 2.1 Shared care task sheet - Available in the further reading section
00:09
Children can form more than one attachment.
00:12
There is often a hierarchy with Mum
00:14
as the primary caregiver,
00:16
backed up by secondary attachments with other close
00:19
caring, familiar adults, that the child may turn to
00:23
if Mum is not available.
00:25
In the nursery setting,
00:27
shared care give a similar hierarchy of carers.
00:31
The key person is the first person the child would chose
00:33
to turn to, but if they're not available,
00:36
they're content to have their needs met by another close,
00:39
caring, familiar practitioner.
00:41
No key person can be with the child all of the time
00:45
and of course that's absolutely true,
00:48
key persons in the nursery have times
00:51
when they have to attend meetings,
00:53
if they work on a shift basis,
00:55
they'll be times when they're not in the nursery
00:57
to greet the child or not in the nursery
00:59
when the child is going home,
01:01
and then of course, sometimes when they're on holiday
01:04
or away sick.
01:07
But it's absolutely not necessary, and wouldn't even
01:10
be possible, or desirable, for the key person
01:13
to be with their child all of the time.
01:15
No parents can manage that,
01:17
no parent spends 24 hours a day with their child
01:21
and those times when the parent is away from the child,
01:25
or when the key person is away from the child,
01:27
a very important opportunity for the child to make
01:29
different relationships.
01:32
Separation distress is a rational
01:34
emotional response to being separated
01:36
from the person you've become dependent upon,
01:39
for meeting your emotional needs
01:41
and providing you with security.
01:44
To minimize this and provide the most effective key person
01:47
approach, it's best to work with key people
01:50
organized in pairs,
01:51
or with a back up person that the child knows
01:54
and is familiar with and who knows that child well.
01:58
It is important we recognize the impact
02:01
and distress that missing someone can have on the child
02:04
and minimize the potential for this
02:06
by organizing a key person approach
02:08
to ensure wherever possible, that a child doesn't feel
02:11
abandoned by their special person.
02:15
Shared care is also about sharing the care
02:18
when you're available and working as a team.
02:20
It is about being aware of each other
02:23
and each other's key children
02:25
and working together so that you can anticipate
02:28
when and how you can support each other
02:30
to provide each child with security and caring
02:33
interactions they need throughout the day.
02:37
It's also important that parents have a feeling
02:39
of trust and wellbeing, knowing that their child
02:42
is understood and cared about throughout the day,
02:45
even if their key person can't be there all the time.
02:48
At drop off and pick up times, it's important
02:51
that the practitioner, sharing information
02:53
about their child, really does care and know about them.
02:57
I leave him in the day when--
02:59
Having a paired person approach,
03:00
or back up person can really make this easier.

Downloads

Facilitators guide - The Role of the Key Person - Shared Care Download
Task Sheet - The Role of the Key Person - Shared Care Download